08/19/14

Learn to prevent UTIs in seniors

Urinary tract infections in seniors can be very serious. Unlike younger people who just experience discomfort and inconvenience, UTIs in seniors can lead to serious health complications, such as altered states of consciousness, falls, and urosepsis, a serious infection.

Preventing UTIs in seniors is the best defense against potentially serious consequences. Doug Higgins, Assisted Living Manager and RN at Friendship Manor has tips for how to prevent UTIs in seniors.

Drink plenty of water

Staying hydrated is the single best defense against getting a UTI. Water is best, but persons prone to UTIs can also drink cranberry juice regularly, as it acidifies urine and fights bacteria.

“Most of us do not drink as much fluids as we should,” Higgins said. “Seniors should make sure they have ongoing and frequent replacement of fluids.”

Practice good hygiene

Scrupulous personal hygiene will help prevent most infections, but sometimes attempts to get clean can cause more harm than good. For example, using baby wipes for convenience can actually leave residue behind that can cause an infection. Also baths should be followed by a thorough rinse to remove soap residue and bacteria that may be in the water.

If you don’t have a hand held shower attachment, a spray bottle filled with water can be used to rinse off.

Wear loose fitting clothing

Cotton, loose fitting underpants are best for preventing UTIs. The material will let the area breathe and reduce the accumulation of bacteria.

Recognize symptoms early

If seniors do develop a urinary tract infection, early treatment will help prevent some of the serious complications that can develop. Early symptoms include a sense of urgency to urinate, going more often, and burning. Occasionally seniors will also experience fatigue and a low grade temperature when they have a urinary tract infection.

“The earlier you catch it, you can minimize the length of the disconcerting effects,” Higgins said. “Seniors’ immune systems are not nearly as robust as a young person’s and it can lead to very serious consequences.”

Friendship Manor provides skilled nursing care for its residents. Click here to learn more.

 

08/12/14

Meet Ron Miller, the friendly Friendship Manor bus driver

Ron Miller 1

Ron Miller is a familiar face at Friendship Manor, or rather just outside the Manor as residents board the Friendship Manor bus to visit destinations outside the senior living community.

The retired Moline firefighter, known as “Chief” to some residents for the last position he held, spends two days a week bringing residents to doctors’ appointments, shopping trips and the beauty parlor. It’s a service the residents enjoy having, especially those who have sold their cars or don’t like to drive in poor weather. But Miller enjoys it just as much as the residents.

“A lot of the people are from our greatest generation and talking with them is enjoyable,” said Miller who listens to everything from tales of yesteryear to the latest visit from a grandchild.

Miller is a favorite among the residents because he is always lending an extra hand, from bringing extra cloth bags on grocery day, to helping residents carry their bags inside their apartments.

“Ron is just an all-around great guy that is good with our residents and a fun guy to work with,” said Nancy Mann, Activities Director at Friendship Manor.

One of Miller’s favorite parts of the job is hearing how the landscape of the Quad Cities has changed over the years from residents who have been lifelong Quad Citians.

“They’ll say, ‘Oh I remember when that was just an orchard or field,’ ” Miller said. “I see how much the area has changed over the years from their perspective.”

When he’s not driving the Friendship Manor bus, Miller enjoys golfing when the weather is good and having a weekly game day with his parents. Miller said driving residents to their appointments and social activities outside Friendship Manor is a very enjoyable way to keep busy in his retirement.

“I like my coworkers and I like the residents,” Miller said. “I enjoy being part of making their lives easier.”

Click here to view our activity calendar to see what events Miller takes the Friendship Manor residents to.

08/5/14

90-year-olds credit exercise with keeping their mind, body sharp

Bob Chaney 1

They’re in their 90s and they still exercise for an hour a day, five days a week.

Meet Mary Acord, 95, and Robert Chaney, 90. They both have been active all their lives. Acord was an avid runner from when she retired to her early 80s, when she moved to Friendship Manor. Chaney played all manner of sports from football and basketball, to track and field. Both credit their active lifestyles to their continued good health.

“Being active like that really helps as you age,” said Acord. “You just feel good about yourself, that you’ve been able to do that. I had my 95th birthday just a couple
weeks ago. My kids were here and they were proud that I can do all those things.”Mary Acord (2)

Acord stays fit by attending a chair exercise class at Friendship Manor that works out every part of her body, and by following exercise DVDs in the fitness room three days a week. She credits her fitness routine with keeping her body healthy and her mind sharp. At 95, the only physical ailment she suffers from is poor vision.

“You don’t need to be able to see too well to exercise,” Acord said.

Chaney works out in his apartment doing a routine he has developed from his own expertise, as well as exercises taught to him by physical therapists at Friendship Manor. He begins each hour-long workout with a series of stretches, then goes into leg exercises including squats, planks to keep his core strong and strength training with rubber bands and weights.

“I think it’s vital and I think without it, I would be bedfast,” Chaney said. “I have a terribly bad back, but I can pay careful attention to what I’m doing and I can work around it.”

Over the years Chaney has modified his workout. For example, he still walks, but needs a break every quarter mile. But stopping working out isn’t an option for him.

“There’s no question about it. You either stay active or you sink,” Chaney said. “As you age, you have less equilibrium, less strength, less flexibility, so you have to modify your activities accordingly. But you can still do most of the things you always did, but maybe a little differently.”

Click here to take a virtual tour of Friendship Manor and learn more about the exercise options for seniors at Friendship Manor.

07/22/14

How to ensure your parent is taking their medication properly

Friendship Manor

Not taking medications properly can be a critical problem, especially for seniors. Besides the medications not doing the job they are supposed to, such as preventing Alzheimer’s or dementia from progressing, taking medication at the wrong time, without food or fluids, in the wrong dose, or not at all, can lead to dizziness, ulcers, stroke, and congestive heart failure.

Dan Clem-McKinley, Director of Friendship Manor In-Home Services, said the key to making sure your parent or loved one is taking their medication properly is keeping an open line of communication between your parent and their doctor.

“We all know as we get older we have the tendency of forgetting,” Clem-McKinley said. “If I would be dealing with my parent, the first thing I would do is ask, ‘What medications are you on? When are you taking them? What is the dosage?’ And if they are doing it correctly, then that’s OK.”

Clem-McKinley said the key is double-checking with both your parent’s medicine supply as well as the doctor who prescribed it to ensure the information your parent has told you about their medication is correct. The latter will require a release from your parent that you may discuss their medications with the doctor.

For example, it is not uncommon for seniors to continue taking pills even after the doctor has stopped prescribing them, or to still be taking a prescription that was filled in 2011, and still has six refills remaining on it because they didn’t take it as often as they should.

Clem-McKinley has even encountered situations where seniors have kept prescriptions for years, thinking the doctor may prescribe it again and they can save money by not discarding the old medicine.

Once you know what your parent or loved one is supposed to be taking and when, it is important to double check that the medications are being taken on time by doing occasional spot checks and making sure the right amount of medication is left and asking why if the number is off.

“The children need to be active in their parents’ lives if they can,” Clem-McKinley said. “That’s the first step, keeping the communications open, even if you live out of state.”

If you are concerned that your parent or loved one is not taking their medication properly, or you are unable to monitor them on a daily basis, Friendship Manor can help. Friendship Manor In-Home Services can provide daily medication reminders, where a trained staff member will go to the senior’s home, multiple times a day if needed, and ensure medication is taken properly.

At Friendship Manor the nursing staff ensures residents take their medication on time, according to the proper instructions and dosage.

Click here for more information about Friendship Manor In-Home Services.

07/15/14

15 years later, resident still loves living at Friendship Manor

 

Pat

Fifteen years ago, Pat Vogel added up all her expenses to keep her home verses moving into Friendship Manor. The costs were the same, but if she stayed in her home, she also had to keep her bushes trimmed, her lawn cut and snow shoveled.

“I figured I may as well come here,” said Vogel who is still glad she made the move all those years ago.

What she enjoys most is constant companionship without having to leave the Manor.

“If you love to play cards, there is always a group of people who want to play,” Vogel said. “Me personally, because I love to read, I love the library.”

Vogel also looks forward to the monthly cocktail parties complete with music from the 40s, monthly birthday parties and the Friendship Manor staff.

“The staff are all just like our daughters and sons,” Vogel said. “They’re all just wonderful. I think they all love their jobs.”

She has been able to keep up a sewing and alterations business she has owned for more than 40 years while living at Friendship Manor. She still keeps her loyal customers and has even gained a few new ones from among the Friendship Manor residents.

“It’s like always having grandma around to sew on a button,” Vogel said.

Vogel also loves the food, especially because she doesn’t have to purchase or prepare it herself.

“We have fresh fruit, I think it is marvelous,” Vogel said. “If you want to make yourself a salad for dinner, you don’t have to buy all those cucumbers and tomatoes. It’s all right there for you.”

07/8/14

Staff pastor, regular services adds to Friendship Manor experience

 

AL Sept. 2013 Photos (99)

Most days of the week you can find a spiritual service on the Friendship Manor activity calendar. From a non-denominational Vespers service on Sundays to weekday Bible studies, there are plenty of opportunities to stay involved in faith-based activities once you move to Friendship Manor.

But opportunities to gather with other people of faith are only one benefit of having Pastor Erv Smith, staff pastor at Friendship Manor.

“The availability of a man of the cloth is just invaluable to people that are hurting,” Smith said. “In my own personal ministry, I try to make it a point to be very visible and very alert.

“I can stop and pray with people right in the middle of the hallway on any given day of the week.”

Smith says his support can be especially helpful as seniors make the transition to Friendship Manor from their homes or from independent living to a higher level of care. Recently he worked with one resident whose health needs required her to be moved to the Silver Cross Health and Rehabilitation Pavilion.

Her family was preparing for a long-term stay and was holding an auction in her apartment to condense her belongings, a process the resident was very upset about because she was concerned some items would be sold that she wanted to hang onto.

Smith not only listened to her concerns, but took her by wheelchair from the nursing wing to her apartment and helped her sort through her belongings to separate the items she wanted to keep.

“Just the fact that you have a staff pastor that is trying to attend to those needs is a great benefit,” Smith said.

Smith leads weekly non-denominational services residents can attend. While a small group of residents consider Smith their pastor, many like Vespers Committee Chairperson Marynell Kirkwood, view the service as an option when they are unable to leave the Manor to attend their own service.

“It is very nice, particularly this winter, which was such an awful, cold winter,” Kirkwood said. “There were as many as 45 people every Sunday because it was difficult to go out.”

Click here to learn more about the Friendship Manor community and download a schedule of spiritual activities.

 

06/25/14

Friendship Manor offers services for the entire community

 

Friendship Manor may have been founded as an assisted living community for seniors. But in its 35 years servicing the Quad-Cities, Friendship Manor has branched out to provide essential services that can be taken advantage of by residents and non-residents alike.

Some of the opportunities Friendship Manor offers the greater Quad-Cities community include physical therapy, group homes for adults with mental or physical challenges and the chance for seniors to begin making connections long before they move into the Manor through Friendship Connection.

“It’s not just in or out in the terms of you have to live there or you don’t participate,” said Jamie Long, who served as President of the Friendship Manor Board of Directors for six years. “It is really becoming a center, not only for the people who live there, but others as well.”

Silver Cross Health and Rehabilitation Pavilion

The Silver Cross Health and Rehabilitation Pavilion provides physical therapy to persons recovering from an injury or surgery.

While this service is a positive for residents who can receive physical therapy without leaving the Manor, Silver Cross also treats members of the community on an in- and out-patient basis. In fact, more than 80 percent of the patients at Silver Cross return to their homes and the community at large.

Click here to learn more about Silver Cross Health and Rehabilitation Pavilion.

Group living in the CILAs

New to Friendship Manor are CILAs (Community Integrated Living Arrangements), a group living option for adults with physical or developmental disabilities. Residents do not have to be 65 to live in the six-unit home with one live-in staff member. In the next five years there may be more plans to expand the CILAs as there is a great need for this type of service in the community.

Friendship Connection

Friendship Manor’s transition program is an excellent way for seniors to make the move gradually from living at home to taking an apartment at Friendship Manor. The future residency program gives priority placement to members, and allows them to take advantage of all the programs and activities Friendship Manor has to offer.

Click here to learn more about Friendship Connection.

Center of the community

By offering diverse services from assisted and independent living for residents, to out-patient physical therapy and future residency programs, Friendship Manor has positioned itself as a leader in the senior living community both in the Quad-Cities and the region.

“They not only enrich the community by the direct services that they offer, but also they help others in the senior services community to become better,” Long said. “They help lead the way, they’re flexible and willing to experiment.”

The variety of services Friendship Manor offers also keeps the organization financially sound by diversifying its methods of income. That means while the news is filled with stand-alone nursing homes closing, Friendship Manor and all the opportunities it provides the community will keep on going.

“It’s called peace of mind,” Long said. “People want the organization, particularly as they get to know it, they want it to continue to be around for themselves, their cohorts and others in the future.”

06/18/14

Friendship Manor looks ahead to continued growth, expansion

Friendship Manor

This month Friendship Manor celebrates its 35th anniversary, which is quite a feat for an assisted living community.

In today’s world where reductions in state and federal programs means it is harder for seniors to qualify for benefits and therefore there is less revenue available for assisted living communities, the success of institutions that offer care for seniors depends on offering diverse care options.

That’s something Friendship Manor has been working on for the past decade since the arrival of Ted Pappas Jr., President and CEO. When Pappas came to Friendship Manor nine years ago, the senior living community only had three service lines.

By the summer 2015, that number will have grown to eight including: independent apartment-style living, independent villa-style living, assisted living, group housing for adults with intellectual and emotional difficulties, in-home services, inpatient rehabilitation, outpatient rehabilitation, and an Alzheimer’s/Memory Care unit.

“We believe that diversity is strength,” Pappas said. “In the day and age in which we live, diverse revenue streams are critical to survivability to organizations.”

Plans to convert one-and-a-half floors to specialized care for persons with Alzheimer’s by 2015, is an example of diversification to fit a need for the community as well as keep Friendship Manor’s future financially sound. In the last two years twenty residents have moved to other senior living communities, making clear the need to begin offering a new level of care at Friendship Manor.

“I think there’s going to be a lot of consolidation and or closures of standalone facilities,” Pappas said. “I really believe the Manor is diversified enough to remain standing. I think we’re one of the last ones in the ring.”

Pappas said other possibilities on the horizon over the next five years include:

  • More group homes, or CILAs (Community Integrated Living Arrangements), for adults with emotional or intellectual challenges
  • Expansion of the in-home care division, possibly into Medicare home care
  • Looking into new affiliations through a planned acquisition or merger with another senior living community
  • Converting a rental home into a child day care for employees

Click here to learn more about Friendship Manor.

06/10/14

Friendship Manor traces its roots back to humble beginnings with The King’s Daughters and Sons

Friendship Manor

Friendship Manor’s roots are traced back to 1941, when Mr. and Mrs. Harry H. Cleaveland donated a three-story home to the Illinois Branch of The King’s Daughters and Sons to establish a home for the organizations senior members.

At the time many of the residents were retired school teachers who never married and did not have children or family to help care for them as they aged.

In the 1970s new healthcare regulations rendered the home outdated and plans began for a continuing care retirement community, Friendship Manor.

From the groundbreaking in 1977, to today when Friendship Manor celebrates its 35th anniversary, the International Order of The King‘s Daughters and Sons, Illinois Branch has been with us the entire time. The aim of the organization’s order also forms the bedrock of our philosophy of care: “Not to be ministered unto, but to minister.” (Mark 10:45)

“We’re all about helping people,” said Sandy Kramer, President of Moline City Union King’s Daughters and Sons. “We’re really happy to call Friendship Manor one of our approved projects.

“It has been recognized on a national level as being a very high quality facility. I think it offers senior citizens living opportunities in which they can still be very active.”

Some of the Friendship Manor residents are members of The King’s Daughters and Sons and volunteer to run the Country Store, which is operated by the organization. The store is one of many amenities residents can take advantage of without leaving the Manor, such as a Bistro, exercise room, bank, woodworking shop, beauty parlor and more.

“It is the busiest place you’d ever want to go to,” Kramer said. “The staff is so friendly. You walk in and you instantly have the feeling that somebody here cares about me.”

Click here to learn more about Friendship Manor and its history with The King’s Daughters and Sons.

05/21/14

It all started with a broken faucet

Three years ago Kirby Platter was on his way to the hardware store to get parts to fix a broken faucet in the condo he shared with his wife Carol for the past 20 years.

At 78 years old, Kirby was picturing himself lying on his back, replacing the parts and remembered an ad he saw for Friendship Manor, where he would never have to worry about another leaky faucet.

When he got home Kirby told his wife they should consider moving. Three weeks later they were Friendship Manor residents.

“It is perfect for us, just perfect,” said Carol Platter. “It was home to us right away.”

The couple brought their own furniture to their apartment, setting up their living room exactly as it had been in the condo. The Platters have no maintence to worry about, have their housekeeping, laundry and meals all taken care of, leaving them more time to enjoy themselves.

“Now if I make something, it is just because I want rice pudding or something in particular,” Carol Platter said. “I definitely have a lot more time. It is just really relaxed.”

The Platters also think making the move to Friendship Manor on their own was good for their children.

“They know we’re being taken care of,” Carol Platter said. “They don’t have to think about what if mom and dad age and we have to find a home to take them in.”

At 73 and 81, the Platters don’t plan on slowing down anytime soon. They enjoy going to the Fitness Center, eating at the Bistro, participating in several clubs and volunteer activities and even helping out with the gardening in the spring and summer.

“I like to get out and just pull weeds too. I just like being outside,” Carol Platter said. “There are so many opportunities right here in the building. It is so nice to be walking down the hall and say, ‘Hi’ to somebody.”

Click here to learn more about the benefits of becoming a resident at Friendship Manor.